1. amare-habeo:

Max Ernst  (1891 – 1976)
The cover page of “L’obscurité du jour" of Jean Tardie , 1974 Edition “Albert Skira”, Paris 1974

    amare-habeo:

    Max Ernst (1891 – 1976)

    The cover page of “L’obscurité du jour" of Jean Tardie , 1974

    Edition “Albert Skira”, Paris 1974

  2. Allinn, from Tallinn Estonia

  3. Listen to Andrei Tanasescu - Secret Thirteen Guide 007 - secretthirteen.org on Official.fm
  4. me peale ülalt jälle paistsid tähed.

    me peale ülalt jälle paistsid tähed.

    (Source: gnossienne)

  5. membrane:

    Graciela Iturbide / Pájaros & Muerte

  6. terivarhol:

EVIL CREATES GOD (detail)

    terivarhol:

    EVIL CREATES GOD (detail)

  7. 
Max Baur, Beech Forest in Fog, 1930s

    Max Baur, Beech Forest in Fog, 1930s

    (Source: the-night-picture-collector, via last-picture-show)

  8. "It is not you who will speak; let the disaster speak in you, even if it be by your forgetfulness or silence."
    - Blanchot, The Writing of the Disaster, p. 4 (via spiritandteeth)
  9. 1910-again:

Jan van Neck, Anatomische les van Dr Frederik Ruysch 1683 

    1910-again:

    Jan van Neck, Anatomische les van Dr Frederik Ruysch 1683 

  10. Frederik Ruysch: The Artist of Death

    Luuc Kooijmans explores the work of Dutch anatomist Frederik Ruysch, known for his remarkable ‘still life’ displays which blurred the boundary between scientific preservation and vanitas art.

  11. likeafieldmouse:

    Bertrand Planes - The Places We’ve Been (2011)

    (via rawforms)

  12. Paris Review - Fugitive Photographs, Francesca Woodman

    Francesca Woodman’s photographs

  13. blackpaint20:

Thought I’d share some bedtime reading I did yesterday; 
10 Visions Of Hell That Will Scare The Crap Out Of You
Via listverse.com

    blackpaint20:

    Thought I’d share some bedtime reading I did yesterday; 

    10 Visions Of Hell That Will Scare The Crap Out Of You

    Via listverse.com

  14. L’Arrivée
    Peter Tscherkassky, 1999

    (Source: youtube.com)

  15. To the Boy Elis

    Elis, when the blackbird calls in the black woods, 

    This is your decline. 
    Your lips drink the coolness of the blue rock-spring.

    Cease, when your forehead bleeds quietly 
    Ancient legends 
    And dark interpretations of the flight of birds.

    But with gentle steps you walk into the night, 
    That hangs full of purple grapes, 
    And you move the arms more beautifully in the blueness.

    A thorn bush tinges, 
    Where your moon-like eyes are.
    O, how long, Elis, have you been dead.

    Your body is a hyacinth,
    Into which a monk dips his waxy fingers.
    Our silence is a black cavern,

    From which a soft animal steps at times 
    And slowly lowers heavy eyelids. 
    On your temples black dew drips,

    The last gold of expired stars.

    Georg Trakl, from Sebastian in Dream

    Elis - A myth-like, enigmatic boy character in some of Trakl’s poems. The model for the name doesn’t originate from the Greek Peloponnesian peninsular, but in the historical fall of Swedish miner Elis Froebom in the 17th century, which E. T. A. Hoffmann (in the novel, “The Miners of Falun”, 1818) and Hugo von Hofmannsthal (in the verse drama fragment, “The Miners of Falun”, 1906) treated in literature. Elis Froebom met with an accident in the mine on the day of his wedding, and his body was discovered decades later perfectly preserved his youth while his bride had become an old woman.